best stock tips


December 7, 2016: Here are four stocks trading with relatively heavy volume among 34 equities making new 52-week lows in Wednesday’s session. On the NYSE, advancers led decliners by more than 3 to 1 and on the Nasdaq advancers led decliners by nearly 2 to 1.

Hanesbrands Inc. (NYSE: HBI) dropped about 5.9% on Wednesday to post a new 52-week low of $21.50 after closing at $22.86 on Tuesday. The stock’s 52-week high is $31.36. Volume of about 31 million was more than 7 times the daily average of 4.5 million. The company had no specific news.


AstraZeneca plc (NYSE: AZN) lost about 1.8% Wednesday to post a new 52-week low of $25.55 after closing Tuesday at $26.01. The 52-week high is $35.04. Volume of around 10 million was about 50% above the daily average of around 6.3 million shares traded. The drug maker had no specific news.

Sigma Designs Inc. (NASDAQ: SIGM) dropped about 34% on Wednesday to post a new 52-week low of $5.20 against a 52-week high of $8.60 and a Tuesday close of $7.75. Volume of about 6.2 million was about 25 times the daily average of around 280,000. The company reported so-so earnings on Tuesday and the stock was downgraded and price targets lowered by several analysts.

best stock tips: The Baltic Dry Index Soaring, and Double Crown Resources (DDCC)


Advisors’ Opinion:

  • [By Matthew Briar]

    It’s not only a scenario that bodes well for an up-and-coming company Double Crown Resources Inc. (OTCMKTS:DDCC).

    What if there were a way to remove all the risks and hassle of shipping things like pellets or beans or salt [which are normally delivered in drybulk vessels] but still utilize all the flexibility of intermodal containers… the big box containers that are just at home on the deck of a ship as they are on a flatbed truck as they are on a train car? There is. It’s called Translock2 (Translock Squared), and it’s going to revolutionize the way many material companies deliver their goods. Commodity companies now have an alternative way of shipping their product without constantly handling it – and losing some of it – en route to its final destination.


    The nearby image is a Translock2 container. If it looks vaguely familiar to most, it’s essentially an intermodal container in terms of size and shape, but mechanically serves as delivery and dispensing platform for drybulk goods like rice, fertilizer, etc. The design allows commodities to be moved with all the flexib ility of intermodal transportation, but without any of the headache of aggregating and splitting up those goods en route to their final destination. With Translock2, drybulk purchases are packaged up by the seller at the supply source, and then delivered — just as ordered — all the way to the buyer’s site in the container. No muss, no fuss, and no middleman. It cuts down on expenses, and lost material.


    Its development worth noting, in that it explicitly circumvents the need for drybulk maritime vessels, and turns intermodal container ships into dry cargo vessels.

    The recent unveiling of the Translock 2 containers won’t actually change the amount of drybulk material we as a species consume. But, it will offer dry goods suppliers an easier and often cheaper option to expensive and often difficult dry goods vessel shipping. Remember, the Baltic Dr

  • [By James E. Brumley]

    When most investors think of potential competitive threats to drybulk shippers like Star Bulk Carriers Corp. (NASDAQ:SBLK) or Euroseas Ltd. (NASDAQ:ESEA), Double Crown Resources Inc (OTCMKTS:DDCC) doesn’t come to mind. Indeed, DDCC doesn’t come to mind for many investors at all, as for all intents and purposes the company it is today didn’t exist until a few months ago. Age, however, has nothing to do with how disruptive it could prove to be for the likes of Euroseas or Star Bulk Carriers. Its underlying idea is brilliant, and it’s only a matter of time before it catches on within the commodity-transportation community.


    What if there was a way to remove all the risks and hassle of shipping things like pellets or beans or salt – normally delivered in drybulk vessels – but still utilize all the flexibility of intermodal containers (the big 20-foot boxes that fit on a truck and a train and on top of the deck of a boat)? There is. It’s called Translock2 (Translock Squared). It was designed by Double Crown Resources, and it’s going to revolutionize the way many material companies deliver their goods.

    The nearby image is a Translock2 container. It should look familiar – it’s essentially an intermodal container in terms of size and shape, but mechanically is a delivery and dispensing platform for drybulk goods. The design allows commodities like sand or livestock feed to be moved with all the flexibility of intermodal transportation, but without any of the headache of aggregating and splitting up those goods to get them properly shipped to their final destination. With Translock2, drybulk pu rchases are packaged up by the seller at the supply source, and then delivered — just as ordered — all the way to the buyer’s site in the container. No material is lost en route, and no distributor or middleman needs to bother splitting up one large order into smaller ones.


    Its development is worth noting, as it explicitly circumvents the need for drybulk ves

  • [By James E. Brumley]

    Despite the lackluster economic headlines and so-so pricing, commodities aren’t being used less and less. Indeed, most commodities continue to see growing consumption. It’s not only a scenario that works in favor of young-and-hungry company Double Crown Resources Inc. (OTCMKTS:DDCC), but what makes Double Crown such a compelling opportunity is that it’s rather insensitive to commodity price fluctuation.


    What’s the biggest risk and hassle of shipping things like pellets or beans or salt? Normally they’re delivered in drybulk vessels, which works, but is rather ineffective. At various points between a supplier and a customer, such goods have to be split up, re-routed, taken off a boat and put on a train (or vice versa). Not only do all the middlemen get expensive, mistakes and spillage cost money.

  • [By Matthew Briar]

    Despite the conclusions that may be drawn by the renewed weakness of the Baltic Dry Index, demand for commodities isn’t drying up. In fact, most commodities continue to see increased consumption… including the dry goods the Baltic Dry Index is supposed to measure shipping costs for. The Baltic Dry Index is rolling over again simply because as much as the world continues to up their need for materials such as iron ore, grains, and gravel, the market to deliver those goods remains saturated. That is, too many boats, trains and trucks are fighting for the existing level of business, pulling the value of the Baltic Dry Index and other shipping-cost measures lower. After all, the BDI is ultimately just a measure of the daily shipping rates for maritime vessels – it’s not actually a measure of materials consumption.


    Not only does a falling Baltic Dry Index not work against young-and-hungry company Double Crown Resources Inc. (OTCMKTS:DDCC), it may actually favor it.

    Hypothetical question: What if there was a way to remove all the risks and hassle of shipping things like pellets or beans or salt (goods normally delivered in drybulk vessels) yet still utilize all the flexibility of intermodal containers? There is. It’s called Translock2, or Translock Squared, and it’s going to revolutionize the way many material companies deliver their goods, and how users of those goods handle and distribute them.


    The nearby picture is a Translock2 container. It should look familiair, in that it’s essentially an intermodal container in terms of size and shape, but mechanically serves as a delivery and dispensing platform for drybulk goods. The design allows commodities like sand or livestock feed to be transported with all the flexibility of intermodal transportation, but without any of the headache of constantly aggregating and splitting up such goods to get them from point A to point B. With Translock2, drybulk purchases are packaged up by the seller at the s

  • [By Matthew Briar]

    Don’t let the lethargic Baltic Dry Index fool you — commodities aren’t being used less now than they have been in the past. In fact, most commodities are still seeing increased consumption, including the dry goods the Baltic Dry Index is supposed to gauge transportation for. The Baltic Dry Index remains in a bit of a long-term funk because, as much as the world continues to increase their need for materials like iron ore, grain, and gravel, the world also still has too much capacity to deliver them. See, too many maritime vessels are competing for too few dollars, serving as a drag on the value of the Baltic Dry Index lower. After all, the BDI is mostly just a measure of the daily shipping rates for ocean-born transportation services. It’s not actually a measure of consumption of those materials consumption.


    It’s not only a scenario that doesn’t work against young-and-hungry company Double Crown Resources Inc. (OTCMKTS:DDCC), but it may actually be a scenario that bodes well for it.

    Thought question: What if there was a way to remove all the risks and hassle of shipping goods such as iron ore pellets or beans or salt (commodities that are normally delivered in drybulk vessels) yet still utilize all the flexibility of intermodal containers? There is. It’s called Translock2, or Translock Squared, and it’s going to revolutionize the way many material companies deliver their goods, and the way many drybulk commodity buyers use their material.


    The image nearby is a Translock2 container. It should look vaguely familiar. It’s essentially an intermodal container in terms of size and shape, but mechanically is a delivery and dispensing platform for drybulk goods like sand or rice. The design allows commodities like sand gravel or livestock feed to be moved with all the flexibility of intermodal transportation (on flatbed trucks, by rail, and on the deck of a boat but without any of the logistical headache of aggregating and splitti

best stock tips: L-3 Communications Holdings, Inc.(LLL)


Advisors’ Opinion:

  • [By Paul Ausick]

    Five teams are expected to compete for the contract: Boeing Co. (NYSE: BA) has joined with Saab to offer a clean-sheet design; Northrop Grumman Corp. (NYSE: NOC) has teamed up with BAE Systems and L-3 Communications Holdings Inc. (NYSE: LLL) on another clean-sheet design; Lockheed Martin Corp. (NYSE: LMT) and Korea Aerospace Industries (KAI) are going with a modified KAI T-50; Raytheon Corp. (NYSE: RTN) has joined with Italy’s Leonardo and Canada’s CAE Inc. (NYSE: CAE) on a version of Leonardo’s M-346 trainer that it calls the T-100; and privately held Sierra Nevada has partnered with Turkish Aerospace Industries (TAI) on another clean-sheet design.

best stock tips: FMC Technologies, Inc.(FTI)


Advisors’ Opinion:

  • [By Matthew DiLallo]

    Following a series of M&A announcements in the oilfield-services sector since the onset of the oil market downturn, French oil-field service company Technip and U.S. oilfield equipment company FMC Technologies (NYSE:FTI) hooked up in an all-stock deal valuing the combined company at $13 billion. Shareholders of each company will own 50% of the combined entity, to be named TechnipFMC, which implies a roughly $6.5 billion acquisition valuation for each entity. The transaction, which should close early next year, will “combine Technip’s innovative systems and solutions, state-of-the-art assets, engineering strengths, and project management capabilities with FMC Technologies’ leading technology, manufacturing, and service capabilities.” Further, it should save $400 million in annual costs by 2019. Moreover, it will enable the combined company to compete better against larger oil-field service rivals Baker Hughes (NYSE:BHI), Halliburton (NYSE:HAL), and Schlumberger (NYSE:SL B), which have all gained strength during the downturn either through M&A activities or cost savings initiatives.

best stock tips: Rhino Resource Partners LP(RNO)


Advisors’ Opinion:

  • [By Alexis Xydias]

    Investors are regaining confidence, squeezing pessimists who say the economy remains sluggish outside of Germany and point to record-low trading volume as a lack of conviction in the Euro Stoxxs 61 percent rally of the past two years. Besides gains in stocks from Banco Bilbao Vizcaya Argentaria SA to Renault SA (RNO), yields on Spanish and Italian bonds have declined to a two-year low compared with German bunds and the euro has strengthened 4.6 percent to $1.35 in the past six months.

best stock tips: Frontier Communications Corporation(FTR)


Advisors’ Opinion:

  • [By Lisa Levin]

    Telecommunications services shares climbed 0.56 percent in trading on Thursday. Meanwhile, top gainers in the sector included Frontier Communications Corp (NASDAQ: FTR), and 8×8, Inc. (NASDAQ: EGHT).

  • [By Paul Ausick]

    Frontier Communications Inc. (NASDAQ: FTR) posted a new 52-week low of $2.31 on Wednesday, down about 4.1% compared with Tuesday’s closing price of $2.41. The stock’s 52-week high is $5.75. Volume was more than double the daily average of around 28 million shares. The company had no specific news today, but the dividend yield rose nearly another full point to 16.6% on Wednesday.

  • [By Brian Stoffel]

    The past few days have been utterly painful for shareholders of Frontier Communications (NASDAQ:FTR). After analysts called the company’s dividend into question, shares have fallen sharply — and they have lost almost half of their value since just this January.

  • [By Paul Ausick]

    Frontier Communications Corp. (NASDAQ: FTR) dropped about 8.5% Wednesday to post a new 52-week low of $1.29 after closing Tuesday at $1.43. The 52-week high is $5.53. Volume of around 55 million shares was about 15% above the daily average of around 49 million. The company had no specific news.

  • [By Paul Ausick]

    Frontier Communications Corp. (NASDAQ: FTR) on Thursday matched a 52-week low of $2.49 posted on Wednesday. The stock’s 52-week high is $5.75. Volume was more than double the daily average of around 25.8 million shares. The company had no specific news Thursday but is on its way to posting a gain of more than 5% for the day.

  • [By Ben Levisohn]

    Frontier Communications (FTR) sunk to the bottom of the S&P 500 today.

    Getty Images

    Frontier Communicationsdropped 4.7% to $2.41, while the S&P 500 declined 0.3% to 2,365.45.


    Why did Frontier sink today? There’s no news that I’ve been able to find, so let’s blame the Federal Reserve, which is widely expected to hike interest rates tomorrow. Frontier is primarily known for paying a hefty dividend–it now tops 17%–and dividends tend to fall out of favor when interest rates rise. (Utilities, however, dropped just 0.1% today, so maybe that theory is bunk.)

    Frontier Communications was the biggest loser last week when it dropped 5.1% after getting cut toNeutral from Buy at BofA Merrill Lynch. It was a string of events that began with Frontier’s earnings on Feb. 28, earnings that led Wells Fargo to opine that the company was still a “show me story.”


    Frontier Communications’ market capitalization fell to $2.8 billion today from $3 billion yesterday. It reported a net lossof $376 million on sales of $8.9 billion in 2016.

best stock tips: Panera Bread Company(PNRA)

Advisors’ Opinion:

  • [By WWW.THESTREET.COM]

    Cramer wanted to talk a little psychology. With its after-hours move Tuesday, Panera Bread (PNRA) is up more than 16% this week on takeover speculation. Panera is an old Action Alerts PLUS name, one the trust sold at a nice gain, too. 

  • [By WWW.THESTREET.COM]

    Then there’s Panera Bread (PNRA) , a company that had lost its way. But after interviewing Panera’s CEO Ron Shaich, Cramer learned that at its new, remodeled “Panera 2.0” stores, the lines were out the door. As the rollout continued, earnings only got stronger. Never underestimate the power of a restaurant redo, Cramer concluded.

  • [By Ben Levisohn]

    Keurigs plight (actually, JABs) is worsening, with the K-cup market slowing to almost no growth now, and Keurig continuing to lose own brands share. Starbucks (SBUX) echoed the notion of a K-cup market slowdown at its seminar on Wednesday (and is guiding for its [consumer packaged goods, or CPG,] growth below recent trends), but it expects to increase its share of total CPG coffee to 20% from 15%. Come early February it will be a year since the closing of the Keurig deal for JAB Holdings. The pressure on JAB is more significant if we take into account the high leverage of the deal (JAB contributed one fourth of the $12Bn price tag). It is a tough predicament. On the one hand we argue that to make that deal work, they need to buy more (own) brands either from the retail channel (that can be extended to CPG: Dunkin (DNKN)? Panera (PNRA)?), or outright buy CPG brands (like the entire Kraft Heinz portfolio, and or Tata Groups Eight OClock brand). But can/h ow do they fund these deals? Maybe Mars and Warren Buffett (Mars is involved in office coffee with Starbucks), private equity, and or 3G can help? While this note is not about Positive-rated Mondelez, we have mentioned before a scenario where Kraft Heinz buys Mondelez and partly funds the deal by selling its own CPG coffee business (~$3Bn we say) to JAB as well as divests the Mondelez 20% plus stakes in Keurig (North America) and Jacobs Douwe Egberts (Western Europe), which together at this stage are worth ~$7-8Bn. But, yes, JAB will need deep-pocket partners and generous lenders. Net, JAB needs to do something soon.

  • [By Motley Fool Staff]

    In this segment fromMarket Foolery, host Chris Hill is joined by Motley Fool analystDavid Kretzmann as they break down how coffee-and-pastry focused JAB Holding Company will fit a fast casual brand into its privately held portfolio. With the acquisition, the JAB is expected to give thePanera Bread(NASDAQ:PNRA)team even more autonomy than usual.

  • [By Billy Duberstein]

    In late March, the company informed investors that after a two-year undertaking, it had finally removed all preservatives from its tortillas, making the Chipotle menu completely preservative-free. The company also called out competitors McDonald’s (NYSE: MCD) and Panera Bread (NASDAQ: PNRA) for marketing their menus as “natural,” as Chipotle insisted these other restaurants still use preservatives made in a lab.

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